Intercommunication

 

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  1. Intercommunication
  2. About this book
  3. Who this book is for
  4. What you need to know to understand this book
  5. How to use this book
  6. Appearance of text in this book
  7. Terms used in this book
  8. Summary of changes
  9. Changes for this edition (plug-in version 6.0.2.11)
  10. Changes for the previous edition (SC34–6587–00)
  11. Introduction
  12. Concepts of intercommunication
  13. What is intercommunication?
  14. How does distributed queuing work?
  15. What do we call the components?
  16. Components needed to send a message
  17. Components needed to return a message
  18. Cluster components
  19. Distributed queuing components
  20. Message channels
  21. Sender-receiver channels
  22. Requester-server channel
  23. Requester-sender channel
  24. Server-receiver channel
  25. Cluster-sender channels
  26. Cluster-receiver channels
  27. Message channel agents
  28. Transmission queues
  29. Channel initiators and listeners
  30. Channel-exit programs
  31. Dead-letter queues
  32. Remote queue definitions
  33. How to get to the remote queue manager
  34. Multi-hopping
  35. Sharing channels
  36. Using different channels
  37. Using clustering
  38. Security
  39. Security exits
  40. Secure sockets layer
  41. Making your applications communicate
  42. How to send a message to another queue manager
  43. Defining the channels
  44. Defining the queues
  45. Sending the messages
  46. Starting the channel
  47. Triggering channels
  48. Safety of messages
  49. Fast, nonpersistent messages
  50. Undelivered messages
  51. More about intercommunication
  52. Addressing information
  53. What are aliases?
  54. Queue name resolution
  55. Queue manager alias definitions
  56. Outbound messages - remapping the queue manager name
  57. Outbound messages - altering or specifying the transmission queue
  58. Inbound messages - determining the destination
  59. Reply-to queue alias definitions
  60. What is a reply-to queue alias definition?
  61. Reply-to queue name
  62. Networks
  63. Channel and transmission queue names
  64. Network planner
  65. How intercommunication works
  66. WebSphere MQ distributed-messaging techniques
  67. Message flow control
  68. Queue names in transmission header
  69. How to create queue manager and reply-to aliases
  70. Putting messages on remote queues
  71. More about name resolution
  72. Choosing the transmission queue
  73. Receiving messages
  74. Receiving alias queue manager names
  75. Passing messages through your system
  76. Method 1: Using the incoming location name
  77. Method 2: Using an alias for the queue manager
  78. Method 3: Selecting a transmission queue
  79. Using these methods
  80. Separating message flows
  81. Concentrating messages to diverse locations
  82. Diverting message flows to another destination
  83. Sending messages to a distribution list
  84. Reply-to queue
  85. Reply-to queue alias example
  86. Definitions used in this example at QM1
  87. Definitions used in this example at QM2
  88. Put definition at QM1
  89. Put definition at QM2
  90. How the example works
  91. How the queue manager makes use of the reply-to queue alias
  92. Reply-to queue alias walk-through
  93. Networking considerations
  94. Return routing
  95. Managing queue name translations
  96. Channel message sequence numbering
  97. Sequential retrieval of messages
  98. Sequence of retrieval of fast, nonpersistent messages
  99. Loopback testing
  100. Route tracing and activity recording
  101. DQM implementation
  102. Functions of DQM
  103. Message sending and receiving
  104. Channel parameters
  105. Channel status and sequence numbers
  106. Channel control function
  107. Preparing channels
  108. Auto-definition of receiver and server-connection channels
  109. Defining other objects
  110. Multiple message channels per transmission queue
  111. Starting a channel
  112. Channel states
  113. Current and active
  114. Specifying the maximum number of current channels
  115. Specifying the maximum number of active channels
  116. Channel errors
  117. Checking that the other end of the channel is still available
  118. Heartbeats
  119. Keep Alive
  120. Receive Time Out
  121. Adopting an MCA
  122. Stopping and quiescing channels
  123. Restarting stopped channels
  124. In-doubt channels
  125. Problem determination
  126. Command validation
  127. Processing problems
  128. Messages and codes
  129. What happens when a message cannot be delivered?
  130. Initialization and configuration files
  131. z/OS
  132. Windows systems
  133. i5/OS and UNIX systems
  134. WebSphere MQ configuration file
  135. Queue manager configuration file
  136. Data conversion
  137. Writing your own message channel agents
  138. Channel attributes
  139. Channel attributes and channel types
  140. Channel attributes in alphabetical order
  141. Alter date (ALTDATE)
  142. Alter time (ALTTIME)
  143. Batch Heartbeat Interval (BATCHHB)
  144. Batch interval (BATCHINT)
  145. Batch size (BATCHSZ)
  146. Channel name (CHANNEL)
  147. Channel statistics (STATCHL)
  148. Channel type (CHLTYPE)
  149. Cluster (CLUSTER)
  150. Cluster namelist (CLUSNL)
  151. Cluster workload priority (CLWLPRTY)
  152. Cluster workload rank (CLWLRANK)
  153. Cluster workload weight (CLWLWGHT)
  154. Connection name (CONNAME)
  155. Convert message (CONVERT)
  156. Data compression (COMPMSG)
  157. Description (DESCR)
  158. Disconnect interval (DISCINT)
  159. Disposition (QSGDISP)
  160. Header compression (COMPHDR)
  161. Heartbeat interval (HBINT)
  162. KeepAlive Interval (KAINT)
  163. Local Address (LOCLADDR)
  164. Long retry count (LONGRTY)
  165. Long retry interval (LONGTMR)
  166. LU 6.2 mode name (MODENAME)
  167. LU 6.2 transaction program name (TPNAME)
  168. Maximum message length (MAXMSGL)
  169. Message channel agent name (MCANAME)
  170. Message channel agent type (MCATYPE)
  171. Message channel agent user identifier (MCAUSER)
  172. Message exit name (MSGEXIT)
  173. Message exit user data (MSGDATA)
  174. Message-retry exit name (MREXIT)
  175. Message-retry exit user data (MRDATA)
  176. Message retry count (MRRTY)
  177. Message retry interval (MRTMR)
  178. Monitoring (MONCHL)
  179. Network-connection priority (NETPRTY)
  180. Nonpersistent message speed (NPMSPEED)
  181. Password (PASSWORD)
  182. PUT authority (PUTAUT)
  183. Queue manager name (QMNAME)
  184. Receive exit name (RCVEXIT)
  185. Receive exit user data (RCVDATA)
  186. Security exit name (SCYEXIT)
  187. Security exit user data (SCYDATA)
  188. Send exit name (SENDEXIT)
  189. Send exit user data (SENDDATA)
  190. Sequence number wrap (SEQWRAP)
  191. Short retry count (SHORTRTY)
  192. Short retry interval (SHORTTMR)
  193. SSL Cipher Specification (SSLCIPH)
  194. SSL Client Authentication (SSLCAUTH)
  195. SSL Peer (SSLPEER)
  196. Transmission queue name (XMITQ)
  197. Transport type (TRPTYPE)
  198. User ID (USERID)
  199. Example configuration chapters in this book
  200. Network infrastructure
  201. Communications software
  202. How to use the communication examples
  203. IT responsibilities
  204. DQM in WebSphere MQ for distributed platforms
  205. Monitoring and controlling channels on distributed platforms
  206. The DQM channel control function
  207. Functions available
  208. Getting started with objects
  209. Creating associated objects
  210. Creating default objects
  211. How are default objects created?
  212. Changing the default objects
  213. Creating a channel
  214. Create channel example
  215. Displaying a channel
  216. Display channel examples
  217. Displaying channel status
  218. Display channel status examples
  219. Starting a channel
  220. Renaming a channel
  221. Channel attributes and channel types
  222. Channel functions
  223. Create
  224. Change
  225. Delete
  226. Display
  227. Display Status
  228. Ping
  229. Ping with LU 6.2
  230. Start
  231. Stop
  232. Stop quiesce example
  233. Stop force example
  234. Stop terminate example
  235. Stop (quiesce) stopped example
  236. Stop (quiesce) inactive example
  237. Reset
  238. Resolve
  239. Preparing WebSphere MQ for distributed platforms
  240. Transmission queues and triggering
  241. Creating a transmission queue
  242. Triggering channels
  243. Example definitions for triggering
  244. Examples for WebSphere MQ for UNIX systems and Windows systems
  245. Starting the channel initiator
  246. Stopping the channel initiator
  247. Channel programs
  248. Other things to consider
  249. Undelivered-message queue
  250. Queues in use
  251. Security of WebSphere MQ objects
  252. On UNIX systems
  253. User IDs on UNIX systems
  254. Message descriptor extension (MQMDE)
  255. On Windows systems
  256. User IDs on Windows systems
  257. User IDs across systems
  258. System extensions and user-exit programs
  259. Running channels and listeners as trusted applications
  260. What next?
  261. Set up communication for Windows
  262. Deciding on a connection
  263. Defining a TCP connection
  264. Sending end
  265. Receiving on TCP
  266. Using the WebSphere MQ listener
  267. Using the TCP/IP SO_KEEPALIVE option
  268. Defining an LU 6.2 connection
  269. Sending end
  270. Receiving on LU 6.2
  271. Using the RUNMQLSR command
  272. Using Microsoft SNA Server on Windows
  273. Defining a NetBIOS connection
  274. Defining the WebSphere MQ local NetBIOS name
  275. Establishing the queue manager NetBIOS session, command, and name limits
  276. Establishing the LAN adapter number
  277. Initiating the connection
  278. Target listener
  279. Defining an SPX connection
  280. Sending end
  281. Receiving on SPX
  282. Using the SPX listener backlog option
  283. Using the WebSphere MQ listener
  284. IPX/SPX parameters
  285. Windows systems
  286. Example configuration - IBM WebSphere MQ for Windows
  287. Configuration parameters for an LU 6.2 connection
  288. Configuration worksheet
  289. Explanation of terms
  290. Establishing an LU 6.2 connection
  291. Configuring the local node
  292. Adding a connection
  293. Adding a partner
  294. Adding a CPI-C entry
  295. Configuring an invokable TP
  296. What next?
  297. Establishing a TCP connection
  298. What next?
  299. Establishing a NetBIOS connection
  300. Establishing an SPX connection
  301. IPX/SPX parameters
  302. SPX addressing
  303. Receiving on SPX
  304. Using the WebSphere MQ listener
  305. WebSphere MQ for Windows configuration
  306. Default configuration
  307. Basic configuration
  308. Channel configuration
  309. WebSphere MQ for Windows sender-channel definitions using SNA
  310. WebSphere MQ for Windows receiver-channel definitions using SNA
  311. WebSphere MQ for Windows sender-channel definitions using TCP/IP
  312. WebSphere MQ for Windows receiver-channel definitions using TCP
  313. Automatic startup
  314. Running channels as processes or threads
  315. Multiple thread support — pipelining
  316. Channel exit considerations
  317. Set up communication on UNIX systems
  318. Deciding on a connection
  319. Defining a TCP connection
  320. Sending end
  321. Receiving on TCP
  322. Using the TCP/IP listener
  323. Using the TCP listener backlog option
  324. Using the WebSphere MQ listener
  325. Using the TCP/IP SO_KEEPALIVE option
  326. Defining an LU 6.2 connection
  327. Sending end
  328. Receiving on LU 6.2
  329. Example configuration - IBM WebSphere MQ for AIX
  330. Configuration parameters for an LU 6.2 connection
  331. Configuration worksheet
  332. Explanation of terms
  333. Establishing a session using Communications Server for AIX
  334. Configuring your node
  335. Configuring connectivity to the network
  336. Defining a local LU
  337. Defining a transaction program
  338. Establishing a TCP connection
  339. What next?
  340. WebSphere MQ for AIX configuration
  341. Basic configuration
  342. Channel configuration
  343. WebSphere MQ for AIX sender-channel definitions using SNA
  344. WebSphere MQ for AIX receiver-channel definitions using SNA
  345. WebSphere MQ for AIX TPN setup
  346. WebSphere MQ for AIX sender-channel definitions using TCP
  347. WebSphere MQ for AIX receiver-channel definitions using TCP
  348. Example configuration - IBM WebSphere MQ for HP-UX
  349. Configuration parameters for an LU 6.2 connection
  350. Configuration worksheet
  351. Explanation of terms
  352. Establishing a session using HP SNAplus2
  353. SNAplus2 configuration
  354. Defining a local node
  355. Adding a Token Ring Port
  356. Defining a local LU
  357. APPC configuration
  358. Defining a remote node
  359. Defining a partner LU
  360. Defining a link station
  361. Defining a mode
  362. Adding CPI-C information
  363. Adding a TP definition using HP SNAplus2 Release 5
  364. Adding a TP definition using HP SNAplus2 Release 6
  365. HP-UX operation
  366. What next?
  367. Establishing a TCP connection
  368. What next?
  369. WebSphere MQ for HP-UX configuration
  370. Basic configuration
  371. Channel configuration
  372. WebSphere MQ for HP-UX sender-channel definitions using SNA
  373. WebSphere MQ for HP-UX receiver-channel definitions using SNA
  374. WebSphere MQ for HP-UX invokable TP setup
  375. WebSphere MQ for HP-UX sender-channel definitions using TCP
  376. WebSphere MQ for HP-UX receiver-channel definitions using TCP/IP
  377. Example configuration - IBM WebSphere MQ for Solaris
  378. Configuration parameters for an LU 6.2 connection using SNAP-IX
  379. Configuration worksheet
  380. Explanation of terms
  381. Establishing a session using SNAP-IX
  382. SNAP-IX configuration
  383. Defining a local node
  384. Adding a Token Ring Port
  385. Defining a local LU
  386. APPC configuration
  387. Defining a remote node
  388. Defining a partner LU
  389. Defining a link station
  390. Defining a mode
  391. Adding CPI-C information
  392. Adding a TP definition using SNAP-IX Release 6
  393. SNAP-IX operation
  394. What next?
  395. Establishing a TCP connection
  396. What next?
  397. WebSphere MQ for Solaris configuration
  398. Basic configuration
  399. Channel configuration
  400. WebSphere MQ for Solaris sender-channel definitions using SNAP-IX SNA
  401. WebSphere MQ for Solaris receiver-channel definitions using SNA
  402. WebSphere MQ for Solaris sender-channel definitions using TCP
  403. WebSphere MQ for Solaris receiver-channel definitions using TCP/IP
  404. Example configuration - IBM WebSphere MQ for Linux
  405. Configuration parameters for an LU 6.2 connection
  406. Configuration worksheet
  407. Explanation of terms
  408. Establishing a session using Communications Server for Linux
  409. Communications Server for Linux configuration
  410. Defining a local node
  411. Adding a Token-Ring port
  412. Defining a local LU
  413. APPC configuration
  414. Defining a remote node
  415. Defining a partner LU
  416. Defining a link station
  417. Defining a mode
  418. Adding CPI-C information
  419. Adding a TP definition
  420. Communications Server for Linux operation
  421. What next?
  422. Establishing a TCP connection
  423. Using the inet daemon (INETD)
  424. Using the extended inet daemon (XINETD)
  425. What next?
  426. WebSphere MQ for Linux configuration
  427. Basic configuration
  428. Channel configuration
  429. WebSphere MQ for Linux (x86 platform) sender-channel definitions using SNA
  430. WebSphere MQ for Linux (x86 platform) receiver-channel definitions using SNA
  431. WebSphere MQ for Linux sender-channel definitions using TCP
  432. WebSphere MQ for Linux receiver-channel definitions using TCP/IP
  433. Message channel planning example for distributed platforms
  434. What the example shows
  435. Queue manager QM1 example
  436. Queue manager QM2 example
  437. Running the example
  438. Expanding this example
  439. DQM in WebSphere MQ for z/OS
  440. Monitoring and controlling channels on z/OS
  441. The DQM channel control function
  442. Using the panels and the commands
  443. Using the initial panel
  444. Managing your channels
  445. Defining a channel
  446. Altering a channel definition
  447. Displaying a channel definition
  448. Delete a channel definition
  449. Displaying information about the channel initiator
  450. Starting a channel initiator
  451. Stopping a channel initiator
  452. Starting a channel listener
  453. Stopping a channel listener
  454. Starting a channel
  455. Starting a shared channel
  456. Testing a channel
  457. Resetting message sequence numbers for a channel
  458. Resolving in-doubt messages on a channel
  459. Stopping a channel
  460. Usage notes
  461. Displaying channel status
  462. Displaying cluster channels
  463. Preparing WebSphere MQ for z/OS
  464. Defining DQM requirements to WebSphere MQ
  465. Defining WebSphere MQ objects
  466. Transmission queues and triggering channels
  467. Synchronization queue
  468. Channel command queues
  469. Starting the channel initiator
  470. Stopping the channel initiator
  471. Other things to consider
  472. Operator messages
  473. Channel operation commands
  474. Undelivered-message queue
  475. Queues in use
  476. Security changes
  477. Communications stopped
  478. TCP
  479. LU6.2
  480. z/OS Automatic Restart Management (ARM)
  481. Set up communication for z/OS
  482. Deciding on a connection
  483. Defining a TCP connection
  484. Sending end
  485. Receiving on TCP
  486. Using the TCP listener backlog option
  487. Defining an LU6.2 connection
  488. APPC/MVS setup
  489. Connecting to APPC/MVS (LU 6.2)
  490. Receiving on LU 6.2
  491. Example configuration - IBM WebSphere MQ for z/OS
  492. Configuration parameters for an LU 6.2 connection
  493. Configuration worksheet
  494. Explanation of terms
  495. Establishing an LU 6.2 connection
  496. Defining yourself to the network
  497. Defining a connection to a partner
  498. Establishing a TCP connection
  499. What next?
  500. WebSphere MQ for z/OS configuration
  501. Channel configuration
  502. WebSphere MQ for z/OS sender-channel definitions using LU 6.2
  503. WebSphere MQ for z/OS receiver-channel definitions using LU 6.2
  504. WebSphere MQ for z/OS sender-channel definitions using TCP
  505. WebSphere MQ for z/OS receiver-channel definitions using TCP
  506. Message channel planning example for z/OS
  507. What the example shows
  508. Queue manager QM1 example
  509. Remote queue definition
  510. Transmission queue definition
  511. Sender channel definition
  512. Receiver channel definition
  513. Reply-to queue definition
  514. Queue manager QM2 example
  515. Local queue definition
  516. Transmission queue definition
  517. Sender channel definition
  518. Receiver channel definition
  519. Running the example
  520. Expanding this example
  521. Preparing WebSphere MQ for z/OS for DQM with queue-sharing groups
  522. Concepts
  523. Class of service
  524. Generic interface
  525. Components
  526. Listeners
  527. Transmission queues and triggering
  528. Triggering
  529. Message channel agents
  530. Inbound
  531. Outbound
  532. Synchronization queue
  533. Benefits
  534. Load-balanced channel start
  535. Shared channel recovery
  536. Client channels
  537. Clusters and queue-sharing groups
  538. Channels and serialization
  539. Intra-group queuing
  540. Set up communication for WebSphere MQ for z/OS using queue-sharing groups
  541. Deciding on a connection
  542. Defining a TCP connection
  543. Sending end
  544. Receiving on TCP using a queue-sharing group
  545. Defining an LU6.2 connection
  546. Connecting to APPC/MVS (LU 6.2)
  547. Receiving on LU 6.2 using a generic interface
  548. Example configuration - IBM WebSphere MQ for z/OS using queue-sharing groups
  549. Configuration parameters for an LU 6.2 connection
  550. Configuration worksheet
  551. Explanation of terms
  552. Establishing an LU 6.2 connection into a queue-sharing group
  553. Defining yourself to the network using generic resources
  554. Defining a connection to a partner
  555. What next?
  556. Establishing a TCP connection into a queue-sharing group
  557. Using WLM/DNS
  558. Using Sysplex Distributor
  559. What next?
  560. WebSphere MQ for z/OS shared channel configuration
  561. Shared channel configuration
  562. WebSphere MQ for z/OS shared sender-channel definitions using LU 6.2
  563. WebSphere MQ for z/OS shared receiver-channel definitions using LU 6.2
  564. WebSphere MQ for z/OS shared sender-channel definitions using TCP
  565. WebSphere MQ for z/OS shared receiver-channel definitions using TCP
  566. Message channel planning example for z/OS using queue-sharing groups
  567. What this example shows
  568. Queue-sharing group definitions
  569. Shared objects
  570. Group objects
  571. Sender channel definition
  572. Receiver channel definition
  573. Queue manager QM3 example
  574. Sender channel definition
  575. Remaining definitions
  576. Running the example
  577. Intra-group queuing
  578. Concepts
  579. Intra-group queuing and the intra-group queuing agent
  580. Terminology
  581. Intra-group queuing
  582. Shared transmission queue for use by intra-group queuing
  583. Intra-group queuing agent
  584. Benefits
  585. Reduced system definitions
  586. Reduced system administration
  587. Improved performance
  588. Supports migration
  589. Transparent delivery of messages when multi-hopping between queue managers in a queue-sharing group
  590. Limitations
  591. Messages eligible for transfer using intra-group queuing
  592. Number of intra-group queuing agents per queue manager
  593. Starting and stopping the intra-group queuing agent
  594. Getting started
  595. Enabling intra-group queuing
  596. Disabling intra-group queuing
  597. Using intra-group queuing
  598. Configurations
  599. Distributed queuing with intra-group queuing (multiple delivery paths)
  600. Open/Put processing
  601. Flow for large messages
  602. Flow for small messages
  603. Points to note about such a configuration
  604. Clustering with intra-group queuing (multiple delivery paths)
  605. Points to note about such a configuration
  606. Clustering, intra-group queuing and distributed queuing
  607. Messages
  608. Message structure
  609. Message persistence
  610. Delivery of messages
  611. Batching of messages
  612. Message size
  613. Default message persistence and default message priority
  614. Undelivered/unprocessed messages
  615. Report messages
  616. Confirmation of arrival (COA)/confirmation of delivery (COD) report messages
  617. Expiry report messages
  618. Exception report messages
  619. Security
  620. Intra-group queuing authority (IGQAUT)
  621. Intra-group queuing user indentifier (IGQUSER)
  622. Specific properties
  623. Queue name resolution
  624. Invalidation of object handles (MQRC_OBJECT_CHANGED)
  625. Self recovery of the intra-group queuing agent
  626. Retry capability of the intra-group queuing agent
  627. The intra-group queuing agent and Serialization
  628. Example configuration — WebSphere MQ for z/OS using intra-group queuing
  629. Configuration 1
  630. Configuration 2
  631. Configuration 3
  632. Configuration 1 definitions
  633. On QMG1
  634. On QMG2
  635. On QMG3
  636. Configuration 2 definitions
  637. On QMG1
  638. On QMG2
  639. On QMG3
  640. Configuration 3 definitions
  641. On QMG1
  642. On QMG2
  643. On QMG3
  644. Running the example
  645. Expanding the example
  646. DQM in WebSphere MQ for iSeries
  647. Monitoring and controlling channels on iSeries
  648. The DQM channel control function
  649. Operator commands
  650. Getting started
  651. Creating objects
  652. Creating a channel
  653. Starting a channel
  654. Selecting a channel
  655. Browsing a channel
  656. Renaming a channel
  657. Work with channel status
  658. Work-with-channel choices
  659. Panel choices
  660. F6=Create
  661. 2=Change
  662. 3=Copy
  663. 4=Delete
  664. 5=Display
  665. 8=Work with Status
  666. 13=Ping
  667. Ping with LU 6.2
  668. 14=Start
  669. 15=End
  670. Stop immediate
  671. Stop controlled
  672. 16=Reset
  673. 17=Resolve
  674. Preparing WebSphere MQ for iSeries
  675. Creating a transmission queue
  676. Triggering channels
  677. Channel programs
  678. Channel states on i5/OS
  679. Other things to consider
  680. Undelivered-message queue
  681. Queues in use
  682. Maximum number of channels
  683. Security of WebSphere MQ for iSeries objects
  684. System extensions and user-exit programs
  685. Set up communication for WebSphere MQ for iSeries
  686. Deciding on a connection
  687. Defining a TCP connection
  688. Receiving on TCP
  689. Using the TCP SO_KEEPALIVE option
  690. Using the TCP listener backlog option
  691. Defining an LU 6.2 connection
  692. Initiating end (Sending)
  693. Initiated end (Receiver)
  694. Note on Work Management
  695. Example configuration - IBM WebSphere MQ for iSeries
  696. Configuration parameters for an LU 6.2 connection
  697. Configuration worksheet
  698. Explanation of terms
  699. How to find network attributes
  700. How to find the value of Resource name
  701. Establishing an LU 6.2 connection
  702. Local node configuration
  703. Creating a line description
  704. Adding a routing entry
  705. Connection to partner node
  706. Creating a controller description
  707. Creating a device description
  708. Creating CPI-C side information
  709. Adding a communications entry for APPC
  710. Adding a configuration list entry
  711. What next?
  712. Establishing a TCP connection
  713. Adding a TCP/IP interface
  714. Adding a TCP/IP loopback interface
  715. Adding a default route
  716. What next?
  717. WebSphere MQ for iSeries configuration
  718. Basic configuration
  719. Channel configuration
  720. WebSphere MQ for iSeries sender-channel definitions using SNA
  721. WebSphere MQ for iSeries receiver-channel definitions using SNA
  722. WebSphere MQ for iSeries sender-channel definitions using TCP
  723. WebSphere MQ for iSeries receiver-channel definitions using TCP
  724. Defining a queue
  725. Defining a channel
  726. Message channel planning example for WebSphere MQ for iSeries
  727. What the example shows
  728. Queue manager QM1 example
  729. Queue manager QM2 example
  730. Running the example
  731. Expanding this example
  732. Further intercommunication considerations
  733. Channel-exit programs
  734. What are channel-exit programs?
  735. Processing overview
  736. Channel security exit programs
  737. Writing a security exit
  738. Differences in behavior between security exits defined on CLNTCONN/SVRCONN channel pairs and other channel pairs
  739. Channel send and receive exit programs
  740. Channel send exit programs — reserving space
  741. How you reserve space and use it
  742. What happens at the receiving end of the channel
  743. Multiple send exits
  744. Channel message exit programs
  745. Message conversion outside the message exit
  746. Which headers are processed
  747. How the headers are processed
  748. What is the MQCXP HeaderLength?
  749. MQWIH
  750. Channel message retry exit program
  751. Channel auto-definition exit program
  752. Writing and compiling channel-exit programs
  753. WebSphere MQ for z/OS
  754. WebSphere MQ for iSeries
  755. WebSphere MQ for Windows server, WebSphere MQ client for Windows
  756. WebSphere MQ for AIX
  757. WebSphere MQ for HP-UX
  758. WebSphere MQ for Solaris
  759. WebSphere MQ for Linux
  760. SSPI security exit
  761. Channel-exit calls and data structures
  762. Data definition files
  763. MQ_CHANNEL_EXIT – Channel exit
  764. Syntax
  765. Parameters
  766. ChannelExitParms (MQCXP) – input/output
  767. ChannelDefinition (MQCD) – input/output
  768. DataLength (MQLONG) – input/output
  769. AgentBufferLength (MQLONG) – input
  770. AgentBuffer (MQBYTE×AgentBufferLength) – input/output
  771. ExitBufferLength (MQLONG) – input/output
  772. ExitBufferAddr (MQPTR) – input/output
  773. Usage notes
  774. C invocation
  775. COBOL invocation
  776. RPG invocation (ILE)
  777. RPG invocation (OPM)
  778. System/390 assembler invocation
  779. MQ_CHANNEL_AUTO_DEF_EXIT – Channel auto-definition exit
  780. Syntax
  781. Parameters
  782. ChannelExitParms (MQCXP) – input/output
  783. ChannelDefinition (MQCD) – input/output
  784. Usage notes
  785. C invocation
  786. COBOL invocation
  787. RPG invocation (ILE)
  788. RPG invocation (OPM)
  789. System/390 assembler invocation
  790. MQXWAIT – Wait in exit
  791. Syntax
  792. Parameters
  793. Hconn (MQHCONN) – input
  794. WaitDesc (MQXWD) – input/output
  795. CompCode (MQLONG) – output
  796. Reason (MQLONG) – output
  797. C invocation
  798. System/390 assembler invocation
  799. MQCD – Channel definition
  800. Exit name fields
  801. Fields
  802. ChannelName (MQCHAR20)
  803. V(MQLONG)
  804. ChannelType (MQLONG)
  805. TransportType (MQLONG)
  806. Desc (MQCHAR64)
  807. QMgrName (MQCHAR48)
  808. XmitQName (MQCHAR48)
  809. ShortConnectionName (MQCHAR20)
  810. MCAName (MQCHAR20)
  811. ModeName (MQCHAR8)
  812. TpName (MQCHAR64)
  813. BatchSize (MQLONG)
  814. DiscInterval (MQLONG)
  815. ShortRetryCount (MQLONG)
  816. ShortRetryInterval (MQLONG)
  817. LongRetryCount (MQLONG)
  818. LongRetryInterval (MQLONG)
  819. SecurityExit (MQCHARn)
  820. MsgExit (MQCHARn)
  821. SendExit (MQCHARn)
  822. ReceiveExit (MQCHARn)
  823. SeqNumberWrap (MQLONG)
  824. MaxMsgLength (MQLONG)
  825. PutAuthority (MQLONG)
  826. DataConversion (MQLONG)
  827. SecurityUserData (MQCHAR32)
  828. MsgUserData (MQCHAR32)
  829. SendUserData (MQCHAR32)
  830. ReceiveUserData (MQCHAR32)
  831. UserIdentifier (MQCHAR12)
  832. Password (MQCHAR12)
  833. MCAUserIdentifier (MQCHAR12)
  834. MCAType (MQLONG)
  835. ConnectionName (MQCHAR264)
  836. RemoteUserIdentifier (MQCHAR12)
  837. RemotePassword (MQCHAR12)
  838. MsgRetryExit (MQCHARn)
  839. MsgRetryUserData (MQCHAR32)
  840. MsgRetryCount (MQLONG)
  841. MsgRetryInterval (MQLONG)
  842. HeartbeatInterval (MQLONG)
  843. BatchInterval (MQLONG)
  844. NonPersistentMsgSpeed (MQLONG)
  845. StrucLength (MQLONG)
  846. ExitNameLength (MQLONG)
  847. ExitDataLength (MQLONG)
  848. MsgExitsDefined (MQLONG)
  849. SendExitsDefined (MQLONG)
  850. ReceiveExitsDefined (MQLONG)
  851. MsgExitPtr (MQPTR)
  852. MsgUserDataPtr (MQPTR)
  853. SendExitPtr (MQPTR)
  854. SendUserDataPtr (MQPTR)
  855. ReceiveExitPtr (MQPTR)
  856. ReceiveUserDataPtr (MQPTR)
  857. ClusterPtr (MQPTR)
  858. ClustersDefined (MQLONG)
  859. NetworkPriority (MQLONG)
  860. LongMCAUserIdLength (MQLONG)
  861. LongRemoteUserIdLength (MQLONG)
  862. LongMCAUserIdPtr (MQPTR)
  863. LongRemoteUserIdPtr (MQPTR)
  864. MCASecurityId (MQBYTE40)
  865. RemoteSecurityId (MQBYTE40)
  866. SSLCipherSpec (MQCHAR32)
  867. SSLPeerNamePtr (MQPTR)
  868. SSLPeerNameLength (MQLONG)
  869. SSLClientAuth (MQLONG)
  870. KeepAliveInterval (MQLONG)
  871. LocalAddress (MQCHAR48)
  872. BatchHeartbeat (MQLONG)
  873. HdrCompList [2] (MQLONG)
  874. MsgCompList [16] (MQLONG)
  875. CLWLChannelRank (MQLONG)
  876. CLWLChannelPriority (MQLONG)
  877. CLWLChannelWeight (MQLONG)
  878. ChannelMonitoring (MQLONG)
  879. ChannelStatistics (MQLONG)
  880. C declaration
  881. COBOL declaration
  882. RPG declaration (ILE)
  883. RPG declaration (OPM)
  884. System/390 assembler declaration
  885. Visual Basic declaration
  886. MQCXP – Channel exit parameter
  887. Fields
  888. StrucId (MQCHAR4)
  889. V(MQLONG)
  890. ExitId (MQLONG)
  891. ExitReason (MQLONG)
  892. ExitResponse (MQLONG)
  893. ExitResponse2 (MQLONG)
  894. Feedback (MQLONG)
  895. MaxSegmentLength (MQLONG)
  896. ExitUserArea (MQBYTE16)
  897. ExitData (MQCHAR32)
  898. MsgRetryCount (MQLONG)
  899. MsgRetryInterval (MQLONG)
  900. MsgRetryReason (MQLONG)
  901. HeaderLength (MQLONG)
  902. PartnerName (MQCHAR48)
  903. FAPLevel (MQLONG)
  904. CapabilityFlags (MQLONG)
  905. ExitNumber (MQLONG)
  906. ExitSpace (MQLONG)
  907. SSLCertUserId (MQCHAR12)
  908. SSLRemCertIssNameLength (MQLONG)
  909. SSLRemCertIssNamePtr (PMQVOID)
  910. SecurityParms (PMQCSP)
  911. CurHdrCompression (MQLONG)
  912. CurMsgCompression (MQLONG)
  913. C declaration
  914. COBOL declaration
  915. RPG declaration (ILE)
  916. RPG declaration (OPM)
  917. System/390 assembler declaration
  918. MQXWD – Exit wait descriptor
  919. Fields
  920. StrucId (MQCHAR4)
  921. V(MQLONG)
  922. Reserved1 (MQLONG)
  923. Reserved2 (MQLONG)
  924. Reserved3 (MQLONG)
  925. ECB (MQLONG)
  926. C declaration
  927. System/390 assembler declaration
  928. Problem determination in DQM
  929. Error message from channel control
  930. Ping
  931. Dead-letter queue considerations
  932. Validation checks
  933. In-doubt relationship
  934. Channel startup negotiation errors
  935. When a channel refuses to run
  936. Triggered channels
  937. Conversion failure
  938. Network problems
  939. Adopting an MCA
  940. Registration time for DDNS
  941. Dial-up problems
  942. Retrying the link
  943. Retry considerations
  944. Shared channel recovery on z/OS
  945. Data structures
  946. User exit problems
  947. Disaster recovery
  948. Channel switching
  949. Connection switching
  950. Client problems
  951. Terminating clients
  952. Error logs
  953. Error logs for Windows
  954. Error logs on UNIX systems
  955. Error logs on z/OS
  956. Message monitoring
  957. Queue name resolution
  958. What is queue name resolution?
  959. How queue name resolution works
  960. Configuration file stanzas for distributed queuing
  961. Programming interface information
  962. Trademarks