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WebSphere MQ Clients

 

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  1. Figures
  2. Tables
  3. About this book
  4. What you need to know to understand this book
  5. Terms used in this book
  6. How to use this book
  7. Summary of changes
  8. Changes for this edition (GC34-6590-01)
  9. Introduction to WebSphere MQ clients
  10. Overview of WebSphere MQ clients
  11. What is a WebSphere MQ client?
  12. How the client connects to the server
  13. What is an extended transactional client?
  14. Why use WebSphere MQ clients?
  15. What applications run on a WebSphere MQ client?
  16. How do I set up a WebSphere MQ client?
  17. Installing WebSphere MQ clients
  18. Preparing for installation
  19. Platform support for WebSphere MQ clients
  20. Platform support for extended transactional clients
  21. Applications on WebSphere MQ V6.0 clients
  22. Communications
  23. Performance considerations
  24. Hardware and software requirements
  25. AIX client: hardware and software required
  26. HP-UX client: hardware and software required
  27. Linux client: hardware and software required
  28. Solaris client: hardware and software required
  29. Windows client: hardware and software required
  30. Installing client components
  31. Installing a WebSphere MQ client and server system
  32. Installing from an electronic software download
  33. Installing WebSphere MQ clients on the same machine as the server
  34. Uninstalling WebSphere MQ clients
  35. Installing on AIX
  36. Components for AIX
  37. Installing without SSL support
  38. Installing the extended transactional function
  39. Migrating from an earlier version of WebSphere MQ for AIX
  40. Changing the national language
  41. Removing a WebSphere MQ client from AIX
  42. Migrating to and from the WebSphere MQ SSL support
  43. Uninstalling the extended transactional function
  44. Installing on HP-UX
  45. Components for HP-UX
  46. Installing the extended transactional function
  47. Removing a WebSphere MQ client from HP-UX
  48. Migrating to and from the WebSphere MQ SSL support
  49. Uninstalling the extended transactional function
  50. Installing on Linux
  51. Installing the extended transactional function
  52. Removing the WebSphere MQ client from Linux
  53. Migrating to and from the WebSphere MQ SSL support
  54. Uninstalling the extended transactional function
  55. Installing on Solaris
  56. Components for Solaris
  57. Installing the extended transactional function
  58. Removing a WebSphere MQ client from Solaris
  59. Migrating to and from the WebSphere MQ SSL support
  60. Uninstalling the extended transactional function
  61. Installing on Windows
  62. Preparing to install the WebSphere MQ client
  63. Installing the WebSphere MQ client
  64. Other methods of installing the WebSphere MQ client
  65. Uninstalling a WebSphere MQ client
  66. Configuring communication links
  67. Deciding which communication type to use
  68. Defining a TCP/IP connection
  69. Defining a TCP/IP connection on a WebSphere MQ client
  70. Defining a TCP/IP connection on a WebSphere MQ server
  71. TCP/IP connection limits
  72. Defining an LU 6.2 connection
  73. Defining an LU 6.2 connection on a WebSphere MQ client
  74. Defining an LU 6.2 Connection on a WebSphere MQ server
  75. Defining a NetBIOS connection
  76. Defining an SPX connection
  77. Configuring an extended transactional client
  78. XA compliant transaction managers
  79. The xa_open string
  80. The XA switch structures
  81. Configuring for CICS
  82. Configuring for Tuxedo
  83. Microsoft Transaction Server
  84. WebSphere Application Server
  85. Verifying the installation
  86. The installation used for the example
  87. What the example shows
  88. Set up the server
  89. Set up the server on UNIX and Windows systems
  90. Set up the server on i5/OS
  91. Set up the server on z/OS
  92. Set up the WebSphere MQ client
  93. Defining a client-connection channel using MQSERVER
  94. Defining a client-connection channel using WebSphere MQ Explorer
  95. Putting a message on the queue
  96. On the WebSphere MQ client workstation
  97. Getting the message from the queue
  98. On the WebSphere MQ client workstation
  99. Ending verification
  100. System administration
  101. Set up WebSphere MQ client security
  102. Authentication
  103. User IDs
  104. Access control
  105. Using channels
  106. What is a channel?
  107. Message Channels
  108. MQI Channels
  109. Defining MQI channels
  110. Automatically defined channels
  111. User defined channels
  112. Creating one definition on the WebSphere MQ client and the other on the server
  113. On the server
  114. On the WebSphere MQ client
  115. Creating both definitions on the server
  116. Defining the server-connection channel
  117. Defining the client-connection channel
  118. Accessing client-connection channel definitions
  119. Client channel definition table
  120. Migrating to a later release level of WebSphere MQ
  121. Channel exits
  122. Path to exits
  123. Connecting a client to a queue-sharing group
  124. Connecting to a specific queue manager
  125. Connecting to the generic interface
  126. Stopping channels
  127. The Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) on WebSphere MQ clients
  128. Specifying that an MQI channel uses SSL
  129. Specifying the location of LDAP servers that hold certificate revocation lists (CRLs)
  130. When a WebSphere MQ client application issues an MQCONNX call
  131. Using a client channel definition table
  132. Using Active Directory on Windows
  133. Renegotiating the secret key
  134. Refreshing a client's view of the SSL key repository contents and SSL settings
  135. Specifying that only FIPS-certified cryptography will be used
  136. Using WebSphere MQ environment variables
  137. MQCCSID
  138. MQCHLLIB
  139. MQCHLTAB
  140. Using MQCHLLIB and MQCHLTAB on the server
  141. MQIPADDRV
  142. MQNAME
  143. MQSERVER
  144. TCP/IP default port
  145. SPX default socket
  146. Using MQSERVER
  147. Canceling MQSERVER
  148. MQSSLCRYP
  149. MQSSLFIPS
  150. MQSSLKEYR
  151. MQSSLRESET
  152. Application programming
  153. Using the message queue interface (MQI)
  154. Limiting the size of a message
  155. Choosing client or server coded character set identifier (CCSID)
  156. CCSID and encoding fields - multiple puts
  157. Designing applications
  158. Using MQINQ
  159. Using syncpoint coordination
  160. Using MQCONNX
  161. Shared connection handles on MQCONNX
  162. Building applications for WebSphere MQ clients
  163. Running applications in the WebSphere MQ client environment
  164. Triggering in the client environment
  165. Process definition
  166. Trigger monitor
  167. CICS applications (non-z/OS)
  168. Linking C applications with the WebSphere MQ client code
  169. Linking C++ applications with the WebSphere MQ client code
  170. Linking COBOL applications with the WebSphere MQ client code
  171. Linking Visual Basic applications with the WebSphere MQ client code
  172. Running applications on WebSphere MQ clients
  173. Using environment variables
  174. Using the MQCNO structure
  175. Using DEFINE CHANNEL
  176. Role of the client channel definition table
  177. Multiple queue managers
  178. Queue-sharing groups
  179. Examples of MQCONN calls
  180. What the examples demonstrate
  181. Example 1. Queue manager name includes an asterisk (*)
  182. Example 2. Queue manager name specified
  183. Example 3. Queue manager name is blank or an asterisk (*)
  184. Preparing and running extended transactional client applications
  185. Preparing and running CICS and Tuxedo applications
  186. Sample programs
  187. Error log messages
  188. Preparing and running Microsoft Transaction Server applications
  189. Preparing and running WebSphere MQ JMS applications
  190. Solving problems
  191. WebSphere MQ client fails to make a connection
  192. Stopping WebSphere MQ clients
  193. Error messages with WebSphere MQ clients
  194. Using trace on Windows
  195. File names for trace files
  196. How to examine First Failure Support Technology (FFST) files
  197. Using trace on UNIX systems
  198. File names for trace files
  199. How to examine First Failure Support Technology (FFST) files
  200. Using trace on AIX
  201. Appendixes
  202. Appendix A. A review of transaction management
  203. Appendix B. Notices
  204. Trademarks
  205. Index

 

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