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Start the wsadmin scripting client

Use the wsadmin tool to administer application servers, application deployment, and server runtime operations.

The wsadmin tool provides the ability to automate configuration tasks for the environment by running scripts. However, there are some limitations for using the wsadmin tool, including:

The wsadmin launcher supports several scripting objects, including the AdminConfig, AdminControl, AdminApp, AdminTask, and Help objects. Scripts use these objects for application management, configuration, operational control, and for communication with MBeans that run in product processes. We must start the wsadmin scripting client before performing any other task using scripting.

(ZOS) Before starting the wsadmin tool with security enabled, review the topic SSL considerations for WAS administrators and the topic Defining SSL security for clients and servers.

In a flexible management environment, we can connect the wsadmin tool to a base application server, deployment manager, administrative agent, or job manager process. If we do not specify the port of the base application server or the profile name assigned to the job manager, the wsadmin tool automatically connects to the administrative agent.

The application management design does not allow us to install an EE specification level EAR or module that is at a higher level than the client. Client code that runs in wsadmin reads the EAR file and uses introspection of the content to generate the deployment configuration options that are applicable to that application. The client side code cannot process a specification level that is higher than what that client supports..


Tasks

  1. Locate the command that starts the wsadmin scripting client.

    (ZOS) The command for invoking a scripting process is located in the app_server_root/bin directory. Use the wsadmin.sh file.

    Choose one of the following:

    • Invoke the scripting process using a specific profile. The QShell command for invoking a scripting process is located in the profile_root/bin directory. The name of the QShell script is wsadmin. If we use this option, we do not need to specify the -profileName profile_name parameter.

    • Invoke the scripting process using the default profile. The wsadmin Qshell command is located in the app_server_root/bin directory. If we do not want to connect to the default profile, specify the -profileName profile_name parameter to indicate the profile to use.

  2. In a flexible management environment, determine whether to connect to a base application server, administrative agent, or job manager process.

    • Connect to the administrative agent process.

      Connect the wsadmin tool to the administrative agent to configure, manage, and administer servers. If we do not specify connection options, the wsadmin tool automatically connects to the administrative agent process. To connect to the administrative agent:

      wsadmin -lang jython
      
    • Connect to a base application server process.

      Connect the wsadmin tool to a base application server to manage settings for a specific server of interest. Use this connection type when connecting to a node containing one server and is registered with the administrative agent. Use a command such as the following to connect to a base application server:

      wsadmin -conntype SOAP [-port 4213] -lang jython
      
    • Connect to the job manager process.

      Connect the wsadmin tool to the job manager to submit, monitor, and manage administrative jobs. Use a command such as the following to connect to the job manager:

      wsadmin -profileName JobMgr01 -lang jython
      

  3. Review additional connection options for the wsadmin tool.

    We can start the wsadmin scripting client in several different ways. To specify the method for running scripts, perform one of the following wsadmin tool options:

    Run scripting commands interactively

    Run wsadmin with an option other than -f or -c or without an option. The wsadmin tool starts and displays an interactive shell with a wsadmin prompt. From the wsadmin prompt, enter any Jacl or Jython command. We can also invoke commands using the AdminControl, AdminApp, AdminConfig, AdminTask, or Help wsadmin objects. To leave an interactive scripting session, use the quit or exit commands. These commands do not take any arguments.

    The following examples launch the wsadmin tool:

    • Launch the wsadmin tool using Jython:

      (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS)

      wsadmin.sh -lang jython
      
      (iSeries)
      wsadmin -lang jython
      
      (Windows)
      wsadmin.bat -lang jython
      
    • Launch the wsadmin tool using Jython when security is enabled:

      (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS)

      wsadmin.sh -lang jython -user user_name -password password
      
      (iSeries)
      wsadmin -lang jython -user user_name -password password
      
      (Windows)
      wsadmin.bat -lang jython -user user_name -password password
      
    • Launch the wsadmin tool using Jacl with no options:

      (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS)

      wsadmin.sh -lang jacl
      
      (iSeries)
      wsadmin -lang jacl
      
      (Windows)
      wsadmin.bat -lang jacl
      

    Run scripting commands as individual commands

    Run the wsadmin tool with the -c option.

    (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS) If you invoke a command that includes a dollar sign character ($) using the wsadmin -c option, the command line attempts to substitute a variable. To avoid this problem, escape the dollar sign character with a backslash character (\). For example: wsadmin -c "\$AdminApp install ...".

    The following examples run commands individually:

    • Run the list command for the AdminApp object using Jython:

      (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS)

      wsadmin.sh -lang jython -c 'AdminApp.list()'
      
      (iSeries)
      wsadmin -lang jython -c "AdminApp.list()"
      
      (Windows)
      wsadmin -lang jython -c "AdminApp.list()"
      

    • Run the list command for the AdminApp object using Jacl:

      (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS)

      wsadmin.sh -c "\$AdminApp list"
      
      or
      wsadmin.sh -c '$AdminApp list'
      

      (iSeries)

      wsadmin -c "$AdminApp list"
      
      (Windows)
      wsadmin -c "$AdminApp list"
      

    Run scripting commands in a script

    Run the wsadmin tool with the -f option, and place the commands to run into the file.

    (ZOS) WAS for z/OS supports multiple encoding for the Jacl and Jython command files. The default encoding for the command files is ASCII. To run an EBCDIC encoded file, add the following JVM argument to the wsadmin.sh file through the -javaoption flag:

    -Dscript.encoding=Cp1047
    
    For example:
    wsadmin.sh -javaoption -Dprofile.encoding=Cp1047
    
    We can alternatively have two versions of the wsadmin.sh file, one that references the ASCII version of the file and another that references the EBCDIC version of the file. For example, copy the wsadmin.sh file to the wsadminE.sh file. Then add -Dscript.encoding=Cp1047 to the wsadminE.sh file.

    The following examples run scripts:

    • Run the a1.py script using Jython:

      (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS)

      wsadmin.sh -lang jython -f  al.py
      
      (iSeries)
      wsadmin -lang jython -f  al.py
      
      (Windows)
      wsadmin -lang jython -f  al.py
      

      where the a1.py file contains the following commands:

      apps = AdminApp.list()
      print apps
      

    Run scripting commands in a profile script

    A profile script is a script that runs before the main script, or before entering interactive mode. Use profile scripts to set up a scripting environment that is customized for the user or the installation.

    (ZOS) WAS for z/OS supports multiple encoding for Jacl and Jython profile scripts. The default encoding for the profile file is ASCII. To run an EBCDIC encoded profile script file, add the following JVM argument to the wsadmin.sh file:

    -Dprofile.encoding=Cp1047
    
    For example:
    wsadmin.sh -javaoption -Dprofile.encoding=Cp1047
    
    We can alternatively have two versions of the wsadmin.sh file, one that references the ASCII version of the file and another that references the EBCDIC version of the file. For example, copy the wsadmin.sh file to the wsadminE.sh file. Then add -Dprofile.encoding=Cp1047 to the wsadminE.sh file.

    By default, the following profile script files might be configured for the com.ibm.ws.scripting.profiles profiles property in the app_server_root/properties/wsadmin.properties file:

    • app_server_root/bin/securityProcs.jacl
    • app_server_root/bin/LTPA_LDAPSecurityProcs.jacl

    By default, these files are in ASCII. If we use the profile.encoding option to run EBCDIC encoded profile script files, change the encoding of the files to EBCDIC.

    To run scripting commands in a profile script, run the wsadmin tool with the -profile option, and include the commands to run into the profile script.

    To customize the script environment, specify one or more profile scripts to run.

    Do not use parenthesis in node names when creating profiles.

    The following examples run profile scripts:

    • Run the a1prof.py script using Jython:

      (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS)

      wsadmin.sh -lang jython -profile alprof.py
      
      (iSeries)
      wsadmin -lang jython -profile alprof.py
      
      (Windows)
      wsadmin.bat -lang jython -profile alprof.py
      

      where the a1prof.py file contains the following commands:

      apps = AdminApp.list()
      print "Applications currently installed:\n " + apps
      

    • Run the a1prof.py script using Jacl:

      (AIX) (HPUX) (Linux) (Solaris) (ZOS)

      wsadmin.sh -profile alprof.jacl
      
      (iSeries)
      wsadmin -profile alprof.jacl
      
      (Windows)
      wsadmin.bat -profile alprof.jacl
      

      where the a1prof.py file contains the following commands:

      set apps [$AdminApp list]
      puts "Applications currently installed:\n$apps"
      

The wsadmin returns the following output when it establishes a connection to the server process:

Jython example output:

Applications currently installed:
 DefaultApplication
ivtApp
query
WASX70311: For help, enter: "print Help.help()"
wsadmin>

Jacl example output:

Applications currently installed:
 DefaultApplication
ivtApp
query
WASX70311: For help, enter: "$Help help"
wsadmin>

(ZOS) If we receive the message:

[ Unable to allocate an initial java heap of 268435456 bytes. ]
[ **Out of memory, aborting** ]
[ *** panic: JVMST016: Cannot allocate memory for initial java heap ]
CEE5207E The signal SIGABRT was received.
the wsadmin scripting client was unable to start because the region size on your login is not large enough to allocate the minimum heap size (-Xms ) that is specified on the JVM created when wsadmin starts. The default value for the -Xms option, as specified in the wsadmin.sh file statement PERF_JVM_OPTIONS="-Xms256m -Xmx256m, is is 256 MB. To correct this problem, log out of TSO, and then when you log back in to TSO try to increase the value of the Size parameter on your login screen. If we cannot increase the value of the Size parameter on your login screen, check to see if any IEFUSI exits that prevents you from increasing the value of this parameter.

(ZOS) If we are logging in by telnet to OMVS, the value used to determine the address space size that your login receives is specified in the BPXPRMxx parmlib member. BPXPRMxx controls the complete environment of z/OS UNIX. Therefore the value set for the MAXASSIZE parameter determines the size of the address space. However, if we are using RACF, the address size can also be set for an individual user in the respective RACF OMVS segment. In this situation the value specified for the ASSIZEMAX parameter indicates, in bytes, the address space size limit for that user. For example a setting of ASSIZEMAX=0268435456 indicates the address space allocated to that user is 256 MB.

  • wsadmin scripting tool