When to use a high availability manager

 

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A high availability manager consumes valuable system resources, such as CPU cycles, heap memory, and sockets. These resources are consumed both by the high availability manager and by WAS components that use the services that the high availability manager provides. The amount of resources that both the high availability manager and these WAS components consume increases exponentially as the size of a core group increases. For large core groups, the amount of resources that the high availability manager consumes can become significant. If the services that the high availability manager provides are not used, then disabling the high availability manager frees these resources.

The capability to disable the high availability manager is most useful for large topologies where none of the high availability manager provided services are used. In certain topologies, only some of the processes use the services that the high availability manager provides. In these topologies, you can disable the high availability manager on a per-process basis, which optimizes the amount of resources that the high availability manager uses.

Do not disable the high availability manager on administrative processes, such as node agents and the deployment manager, unless the high availability manager is disabled on all application server processes in that core group.

Some of the services that the high availability manager provides are cluster based. Therefore, because cluster members must be homogeneous, if you disable the high availability manager on one member of a cluster, disable it on all of the other members of that cluster.

When determining if leave the high availability manager enabled on a given application server process, consider if the process requires any of the following high availability manager services:

 

Memory-to-memory replication

Memory-to-memory replication is a cluster-based service that you configure or enable at the application server level. If memory-to-memory replication is enabled on any cluster member, then the high availability manager must be enabled on all of the members of that cluster. Memory-to-memory replication is automatically enabled if:

 

Singleton failover

Singleton failover is a cluster-based service. The high availability manager must be enabled on all members of a cluster if:

 

Workload management routing

Workload management (WLM) propagates the following classes or types of routing information:

WLM uses the high availability manager to both propagate the routing information and make it highly available. Although WLM routing information normally applies to clustered resources, it can also apply to non-clustered resources, such as standalone messaging engines. Under normal circumstances, leave the high availability manager enabled on any application server that produces or consumes either IIOP or messaging engine routing information. For example if:

When the servlet in cluster 2 calls the enterprise bean application in cluster 1, the high availability manager must be enabled on all servers in both clusters.

 

On-demand configuration routing

In a Network Deployment system, the on-demand configuration is used for both proxy server and Web services routing. The high availability manager must be enabled on all processes to which the proxy server routes work, and on all processes that are running Web services.

 

Best practices

Although not required, core groups are usually homogeneous. If you have a large installation and you need to set up a mix of processes that do and do not use the high availability manager, you can:


Related concepts

Core groups (high availability domains)
Core group scaling considerations
High availability manager

Related tasks

Disable or enabling a high availability manager